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INVIDI’s COO, Bruce Anderson to speak at 2019 NAB Conference

Cross Platform Addressable Advertising – Today’s Opportunity

With today’s expanding distribution options, Programmers, Networks and Station Groups have the opportunity to maximize the revenue potential of their advertising inventory. New technology unlocks additional revenue opportunities from addressable advertising. Today, this full activation of inventory for Ad insertion/replacement across all platforms – OTT, Smart TV or Addressable TV on set top boxes – is completely within reach.
Our panelists represent a number of key players in this new ecosystem and will shed light on how this new technology is being adopted.
Anyone who is interested in increasing Ad revenue should plan to attend this must-see session!

To view original post at NABShow.com click here.

How an Acronym You’ve Probably Never Heard of Will Change TV Advertising Forever

ACR will kick the addressable revolution into overdrive

In ACR data, brands have the tools they need to execute true measurement and attribution. Getty Images

 

(AdWeek.com) – For years, brands have salivated over the prospect of fusing the best aspects of digital marketing with the tried-and-true canvas of linear television.

Unfortunately, a lack of addressable inventory and a paucity of measurement tools have prevented advertisers from executing campaigns at scale. Today, the addressable TV market, while growing, makes up a small fraction of the approximate $70 billion that brands spend annually on TV advertising.

On the bright side, all of this is beginning to change. In 2017, eMarketer estimates that addressable TV spending grew by more than 65 percent, topping $1 billion for the first time. Meanwhile, there are now more than 74 million households with the requisite technology to be targeted on a one-to-one level.

“Whereas an addressable ad buy tells brands who they’re paying to reach, ACR (automated content recognition) data tells them whether those folks actually viewed their ad.”

But what’s really going to kick the addressable revolution into overdrive is the rise of ACR (automated content recognition) data. If you’re unfamiliar, ACR is a technology used to automatically detect and index content that is playing on television in real-time. As a result, brands are able to use this information to determine when a given consumer sees their ad. As ACR data becomes more widespread, the sky’s the limit for addressable TV.

Addressable’s steady growth is beginning to add up

At the beginning of March, Forrester Research analyst Jim Nail published a survey indicating that addressable TV had reached what he described as an “inflection point.” The report found that 15 percent of the surveyed Association of National Advertisers members are regularly using addressable in their TV plans, with an additional 35 percent reporting that they have experimented, but need to learn more.

Indeed, as AT&T AdWorks president Rick Welday noted in an opinion piece late last year, addressable is already in use by a number of major travel brands. He went on to describe the ways that airlines and amusements parks drove awareness, intent and recall by honing in on audience segments such as “25-54 year-old married women with children in the household.” With that kind of “incredibly sophisticated data-driven targeting” in a “premium, brand-safe environment,” it’s no wonder that GroupM’s Jakob Nielsen recently described addressable TV as “the most sexy advertising product in the world.”

ACR is about to take addressable to the next level

Of course, addressable TV is about to get even “sexier.” In ACR data, brands have the tools they need to execute true measurement and attribution.

Whereas an addressable ad buy tells brands who they’re paying to reach, ACR data tells them whether those folks actually viewed their ad. Previously, the multiple system operators (MSOs) or multichannel video programming distributors (MVPDs) which ran the addressable campaign were the only source of activation data. ACR data provides the first independent verifiable source.

Moreover, by connecting ACR exposure data to offline shopping data sets, advertisers can close the loop on whether their targeted addressable campaign actually delivered results. For instance, a insurance brand might use ACR data to compare the policy binds from people who saw its linear TV ad against a those from an addressable TV campaign. They can then understand cost per new policy sold across both campaigns and identify segments that react to one over the others for future investments.

ACR data also provides cost efficiency for addressable ads, and MSOs and MVPDs can leverage the ad exposure data at device level to fine-tune the targeting of addressable ads by eliminating segments that are already getting a higher frequency on linear and adding segments that are low or zero frequency on linear for specific brands, thus eliminating waste.

It’s time to start preparing for an addressable future

All signs point to addressable TV growing its market share with each passing year. In fact, eMarketer predicts that U.S. addressable spend will increase by nearly 80 percent in 2018 alone. And with ACR data providing the closed-loop attribution our industry has long sought, brands can finally spend with full confidence that they’re really getting their money’s worth.

For advertisers, the time is now to begin investing in this exciting, emerging medium. When all of your competitors are putting their money into high-performing, precisely targeted television campaigns, you can’t afford to be left behind.

Written by: Ashish Chordia, founder & CEO of Alphonso.

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Liberty Global to use machine learning to target ad market with Liberty Insights

Liberty Global is going on the offensive against tech giants Google and Facebook by working collaboratively with broadcasters and the veracity and scale of data harvested from its own platforms.

Laurence Miall-d’Aout

(DigitalTVEurope.com) – “There are lots of fears about how big the threat GAFA [Google, Apple, Facebook and Amazon] has become and how regulation doesn’t seem to apply to them but they don’t have the rich data about how customers behave which we do,” Laurence Miall-d’Aout, VP, data and advanced advertising, Liberty Global told Cable Congress in Dublin. “That is our data and it is up to us – and the cable industry as a whole – to harness this data better.

The cable giant is developing Liberty Insights, presented as a single platform encompassing aggregated consumer data from its 24 million customers, accessed over 14 million devices and uniting 15 billion viewing hours combining customer and viewing data with third party data.

It will use Machine Learning to offer insights on advertising and programming to broadcasters within its stable on a local and macro level.

Broadcasters are increasingly looking to exploit data from user sign-ins and subscriptions in the hope this will lift their fortunes in an advertising market dominated by the major tech platforms. This data will be used to generate the kind of personalised content recommendations that are familiar to customers of streaming services, while it will also allow for more relevant advertising, according to Liberty Global.

“Our first party data can measure against GAFA,” Miall-d’Aout declared. “We are an alternative to Facebook and Google.”

It is one of a multiplicity of industry initiatives seeking to fill the void left by standard TV audience measurements which have struggled to keep pace with advertiser demand for accurate and reliable cross-platform metrics.

“We cannot replace Nielsen and BARB,” she said. “Barb and Nielsen have rigourous research and methodology that we can learn from and even use for our algorithm. But our data with its granularity can provide attribution in a way TV could not offer before.

Like commercial TV broadcasters, the cable operator is looking to turn the concerns marketers such as P&G and Unilever have about brand safety into its advantage.

“A lot of brands turning away from digital money and we are pushing that money back to DTV,” she said.

She said Liberty offered the attributes which had enticed brands to digital platforms in the first place, namely: scale, data, attribution (accountability) and the ability to trade easily.

The company is rolling out addressable advertising in its various territories. With TV3 Group, the Irish commercial broadcaster it owns, Liberty will likely launch TA this year, through the partnership between Virgin Media and rival Sky [Sky AdSmart] announced last June. [TV3 is on track to rebrand its three channels – TV3, 3e and Be3 – as Virgin Media Television in the second quarter of 2018].

“We have opened up Virgin Media in the UK and Ireland where addressable ads are the beginning of the creation of a new marketplace [for addressable ads].”

It has made similar moves in Belgium with cable broadband services provider Telenet.

“As an ecosystem we need TV to stay relevant,” insisted Miall-d’Aout. “We need those TV broadcasters to make money and to that they can recoup some of their traditional business [from the tech giants] and that’s where our data can play a role.”

“We have been historically very poor in creating a unified data sets. The data sets in our organisation have been collected in silos making it difficult to change overnight to a culture based around AI and ML.

She added that the Liberty’s advanced advertising and data unit was on the hunt for ‘data scientists’ to help it adapt.

“I believe if we create our own data platform we can defend ourselves against GAFA,” said Miall-d’Aout. “We can use the data to launch new product, gain new audiences, derive new data and drive innovation.”

She added: “Seventy per cent of the big data initiatives are not profitable. We have the opportunity to change that at Liberty.”

Liberty Global has operations in 12 European countries under the consumer brands Virgin Media, Unitymedia, Telenet and UPC. In addition, it owns 50% of VodafoneZiggo, a joint venture in the Netherlands, as well as significant content investments in ITV, All3Media, LionsGate, Formula E racing series and several regional sports networks.

 

Written by Adrian Pennington

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